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Live interview with Gonçalo Hall about the 1st Global Nomad Village at Ponta do Sol, Madeira Island.

We had the pleasure to interview Gonçalo Hall on our NomadX Travel Community for Remote Workers, the leader of the 1st Global Nomad Village at Ponta do Sol, Madeira Island, Portugal launching in February to July. NomadX and Flatio will be a strategic partners for accommodations on our platform, community and global PR of the first Digital Nomad Village in Europe. Please listen in this interview and come join us! 🇵🇹 ✈️

The 1st Nomad Village Portugal in the Madeira Islands between the months of February to July was Gonçalo’s idea and the government jumped on it. The Project is in partnership with local Startup Madeira incubator/ accelerator to revitalize the amazing Island village Ponta do Sol. Madeira is the #1 European Island vacation, so we expect this to be a huge success. NomadX is the Official technology platform and community partner for the initiative. The The Nomad Village is all about community, connection and lifestyle at this pioneering nomadic initiative.We can’t wait for this to get started in February to July.

To join us on Madeira in the next couple of months, just click here. For those interested in staying on Madeira Island, start your booking through NomadX.com and use our Promo code “DigitalNomadsMadeira” to get 25% discount on service fee. :sunny::rocket::fire: More listings being added daily!!!

Ponta do Sol can offer what the Digital Nomads search when they choose a REMOTE home! 1ST FEBRUARY > 30TH JUNE 2021

Register Now so you can have access to the benefits of choosing Ponta do Sol as your Nomad Village!
#Slack Community
Free Working Space
List of Local Accommodation
Exclusive Events
Local Host
Access to the community


Book your spot to Ponta do Sol Nomad Village clicking HERE


What the press is saying about Digital Nomad Village

Lonely Planet – Be part of a digital nomad village opening in Madeira

Travel + Leisure – This Portuguese Island Is Inviting Remote Workers to a Swoon-worthy ‘WFH’ Setting

Join us on the Travel Community for Remote Workers & Digital Nomads

This NomadX Travel Community is for all current and aspiring location independent professionals, remote workers and digital nomad travelers who are craving for unique global experiences, affordable housing options, freedom, independence and connection. Let’s connect, interact, share, play and support each other! ❤️

Join here.


Read also: CALLING ALL DIGITAL NOMADS: THE PARADISE ISLAND WHERE YOU CAN WORK REMOTELY


Live interview with Gonçalo Transcription

Dave:

Goncalo, where are you at the moment?

Goncalo Hall:

Las Palmas, very fitting with my background.

Dave:

All right, Las Palmas. What’s happening in Las Palmas? Why are you in Las Palmas at the moment and what have you been up to recently? We want to know a little bit about your story, and then we also want to know a bit about this new initiative that you’ve been working on in Portugal.

Goncalo Hall:

I heard, and according to your jacket, it looks like it’s very cold in Portugal, so I came to Las Palmas to escape the cold. That’s pretty much it. And there was a cool community around here [inaudible 00:03:23] people are living, is also around here, I’m a big fan of his work. When I was in Portugal and I wanted to travel somewhere else, the travel bug is still here. So I decided to come to the warmest place I could find in the map, and that was still in Europe because I don’t want to go away. My family is back in Lisbon, so I want to be close if something happens. Yeah, just a two-hour flight, Madeira is just one-hour flight, actually, total from Lisbon. And that’s the reason I want to stay around. All my calls are in Europe, most of my clients are in Europe, some now in the West, as well. It’s better to stay around Arab and make sure that we can live the best life while being still very close to home.

Dave:

It sounds great, man. Well, it looks very warm there. It’s a bit cold right now in the south of Portugal, but we’re still able to surf if we put the booties on and gloves. And so I’ve been going out. My wife’s actually gone out every day for the last week and a half, so it’s been pretty Epic.

Goncalo Hall:

Okay, that’s okay. But in Madeira the water is at 21 degrees. How is the water there?

Dave:

Depends on the day, really? Yeah. With a wetsuit on is not so bad, but I haven’t been wearing a hoodie.

Goncalo Hall:

That’s good enough.

Dave:

Yeah, man. All right, well listen, man, I really want to get started with this interview here and I’ve got some questions for you. And then we also want to know a lot about this whole initiative on the nomad village, because I feel like this is really the first nomad village that we’re going to have here in Portugal, and also, I think you could say even throughout Europe. And you’ve really been the person that came up with this idea and been helping to execute it locally with the Madeira government. And it’s getting very close to taking off, so maybe we can just start with diving right into the initiative. What inspired you, how you’ve been working on it and, and what we can expect from all of this?

Goncalo Hall:

What inspired me is basically, I travel around communities. I know we all have different things that we are driving for, that we are looking for in different places. For me, it was always community, that’s what I love about Canggu, that’s what I love about Thailand that’s what I love about Lisbon. That’s what I love about Madeira was that in summer, it’s this small communities of like-minded people. And let’s face it, all those communities are really, really cool, being around other digital nomads. We are cool, we are different. We left the status quo. So when I approached Madeira to build something there, because basically, I went there in September to organize the future of work conference in Portugal. I think you were the speaker of the round table again. The last round table. I visit Madeira, I get invited by Startup Madeira.

Goncalo Hall:

And I was stunned by that place. It’s insane. Man, last year I was in Asia, Bali, those are the beautiful greens. And I found the same in Madeira. The nature was mind blowing, the ocean is mind blowing. And I just told to the economic minister, “Guys, you aren’t missing out. There is a whole bunch of people that would love to be here, this place is insane.” That’s how I found Madeira. Even though I’m Portuguese, I was not there since I was 10 years old, so I couldn’t remember properly. I just remembered Funchal. And being outside Funchal in smaller places like Ponta do Sol, it was beautiful. And I want to live here, I want to bring people here. I want to show this place through other nomads. That’s how it started for me. Then I said this to the minister of economy.

Goncalo Hall:

I really was excited. And he said, “You have to meet the president.” I met the president in the palace of Madeira, and the dream started. When that started to work with Madeira, I had this dream of doing a small village. We could do it in Funchal, big city, but I think it works better in the community in villages. I see that people will move back to villages and live in smaller places where they can actually live in community. And so that’s why I decided to found this digital nomad village. Basically, it’s a village, it was there. Unfortunately, the village was empty because almost everything was Airbnbs left for tourism. I was speaking with the writer of the hotel in Porta do Sol. And it told me, “It’s sad. I came here because it’s so beautiful, there was people around, and now there is nobody. Everybody left for working in the mainland, or for working in Funchal. This place is a ghost village.”

Goncalo Hall:

And it’s like, why? It’s beautiful. So yes, that’s how it started the nomad village. That’s why it’s in Porta do Sol. It’s one of the most beautiful places in Madeira, and that’s why it’s a village and not a digital nomad city. It could be in Funchal, probably to be 10 times easier, but there was no connections. And I like that feeling when you start to know the guy in the cafe and say, “Hey, Mr. Schuell, how are you? Good morning.” And you start to see the same people over and over again. That’s what I want to rebuild. That’s what we miss in moving to big cities. And I think even as a digital nomad, we can have this feeling of belonging somewhere, and hopefully Porta do Sol is the place.

Dave:

Yes. What is there to do there? What are the highlights that you see when nomads arrive, or remote workers? We have a lot of remote workers here. Some of them may have never experienced a nomadic sort of lifestyle. They might be staying a couple hours outside of the city at the moment because of the lockdowns, but with things starting to open up a bit, what is there to do there and what’s the environment and vibe like, and what do you expect?

Goncalo Hall:

The first thing, without any digital nomads there, what it looks like right now is that you can wake up, walk into the ocean, because it’s a small village. So you can actually walk into the ocean, put some goggles on and find the best diving spots right in front of your house, pretty much. And the co-working space is just two minutes walking from the village. You will not find white sand, you will find more stone cobble beaches. But to be fair, I love it because it’s such a clear water. It’s never muddy, it’s always clear, beautiful wildlife. And on the other side, you have the mountains. And Porta do Sol, it’s in a valley, and all the mountain around is banana trees. And then you have, in the end, you have these beautiful places to walk, to do trails. They call it [inaudible 00:09:45]

Goncalo Hall:

And there’s more than 200 [inaudible 00:09:47] And this is like waterfalls, walking in the middle of the nature. Safe because everything is prepared for people to walk there. So it’s like having the ocean and the nature in five minutes from your home, probably, and enjoying both. After we arrive, things will be even more fun because it will build this community, and that’s what we are really looking for. I’m very excited for building this community from scratch. There was already people there, there were many people already flew to Porta do Sol. There is more than 100 nomads right now in Madeira, around 200, as far as we can count in the communities. So things are happening there. People are meeting up, which is really cool. In Porta do Sol specific, we will organize events pretty much every day. It will be small events, due to everything that’s happening in the world, due to COVID. But to organize masterminds, business meetings, yoga mornings, we will have sports together.

Goncalo Hall:

On the weekends, we’ll just get the car and go around the island, go to the mountains, go diving. It’s infinite possibilities, pretty much. But the most important is with all this, we are building a community. With all these touch points, all the sunsets together. By the way, Porta do Sol is the best place in Madeira to watch the sunsets, so it’s pretty convenient that we are all there. It’s pretty much this. It’s the nature, the ocean, and then the most important thing for me, because nature and ocean, you can find pretty much everywhere. The community that we are building together, it will be insane, insane, insane.

Dave:

I know you’ve spent a lot of time, you’ve been traveling the world. You’ve been to a lot of different locations. You’ve been in the remote work, you’re really a leader here in Portugal. Really doing remote work before anyone else was doing remote work, because here in Portugal, everyone typically has gone to the office. So once the pandemic hit, it seems like, yeah, it’s really been a great opportunity for you to really establish yourself as a leader in this industry, not only here in Portugal, but also throughout Europe. Maybe tell us a bit about that, like what you’ve done and [inaudible 00:11:49]

Goncalo Hall:

… advisors, governments for attracting digital nomads. My two jobs, actually advising companies in implementing properly, remote work. That’s how I started, that’s what I love, that’s what I do most of the days. That’s my main job. Meanwhile, because all the craziness and because I’m an entrepreneur, I can’t stop it. And I started creating businesses, as well. So I started first, my podcast, the Remote Work Movement Podcast, where basically, I’m passionate about the movement, I think you can see that. And there I interview pretty much everyone inside the movement. It goes from CEOs to people changing New Mexico in the west, is re-educating unemployed people, and educating them to find remote jobs. And they are getting employed with remote jobs. So they have pretty much everyone there. Digital nomads, the last guest was Chase, a great guy from [inaudible 00:12:38] in Valencia, also a nomad. He probably will join us in Madeira, as well.

Goncalo Hall:

And that allows us to bring remote to Europe, the future of work conferences. The remote shift that was the first conference, physical conference when we could do physical conferences in Portugal, you were there. Yes, I think I fell in love with this movement. I fell in love with remote work in general, and the possibilities that open, not just for… You can work from anywhere now, but the communities that we can build since now you can work from everywhere. I think I really see that humans like communities. I see that humans like connection. I was speaking today to the morning with a Microsoft event, and I told them, “You can’t forget, people will start leaving big cities because their office will not be the center of your social life anymore.” The office will be just an office, a place.

Goncalo Hall:

The whole social life will go away, and people will not be lonely at home like they are right now. They will live in communities, in smaller neighborhoods, in smaller towns, in smaller villages, because I want to know you. I want to live next to you and say, “Hey, Dave, let’s drink a coffee down there.” And then we can stop both working for five minutes, drink a coffee, talk about life, complain about my boss. You can do the same, but then you go back to work. We miss that.

Dave:

Yeah. Well, kind of my perspective has always been, you have these big conferences, like here in Portugal, we have Web Summit. And it’s an awesome conference, but it’s just for a few days, there’s so much going on. And yet, you get to see the speakers and you get to go out for dinners, but it’s very short. And then as soon as you get to meet people, they’re all gone. What I really love about the nomad movement, and not only being able to get your work done, but living in some place, whether it’s for a couple of weeks, a month, several months at a time or longer, where you really get a good chance to really meet everyone, learn from other people, experience life together. And it’s a much deeper relationship. And the community is not that big, so as you start to travel and visit other places around the world, a lot of times you’re running into these people and a lot of these other top locations.

Goncalo Hall:

Yeah, man. Like for example, Michelle. Michelle is here on the [inaudible 00:14:47] hey, Michelle. I met her in Lisbon and I met you in Lisbon, as well, in the community of Lisbon when I arrived to Portugal. I didn’t know you, I didn’t know Michelle. I didn’t know Derek that’s now in [inaudible 00:14:58] And just living there for two months before the first pandemic came, and it was great. The community, being with everyone. Watching the sunset together, that’s what it’s all about. That’s why I love the community. It’s not about traveling. Traveling is great, but it gets boring after a while, to be fair, at least for me. Now it’s really about meeting the community, meeting these really cool people, building crazy, amazing stuff like like NomadX, The Nomad Escape. God knows, there are so many businesses out there being built by nomads, that’s incredible. This is the people I want to be surrounded by.

Dave:

Yeah, I think that’s a nice part of it too, because you’re able to work with multiple partners, whether they’re local or global partners. I know Nomad Escape has been talking to you, I know Michelle has been chatting with you quite a bit. She’s done an amazing job here in Portugal and has done some amazing co-living events. I’ve talked to a lot of our customers and they all really, really love her. But I think, yes, she’s going to be joining you all too, which is great news.

Goncalo Hall:

Yes. It’s exciting, man. I love what Michelle is doing. I love how she can build a very strong community feeling. Again, community. I keep saying the same word. Within 10 days, the people leave with a smile. They look like they met for one year and they are friends forever. It’s insane how much you can do in 10 days. It’s just completely crazy, crazy, crazy.

Dave:

Nice. Some people have reached out to us, too, just asking about, “Well, how was the surfing, for example?”

Goncalo Hall:

Ooh, it depends on your level. If you are a very good surfer, dude, you are going to have fun. Five minutes away from Porta do Sol, we have the second biggest waves in Portugal, in Jardim do Mar. And it’s usually from 3 meters to 10 meters. So if you are a really good surfer, you are in for a treat. If you are an average surfer or a bad surfer like myself, you need to go to the north of the island. Porta do Sol is in the south where it’s warm. It barely rains. Compared with the north where it’s very rainy. It never rains, we have the sunset. On the north you have all the sunrise.

Goncalo Hall:

But on the north, you can find more of the beginner places. I have several blends to go some weekends to the north, I have some partnerships there. We can stay around there and then we can have a whole weekend and surf pretty much the whole weekend. But on the south, Jardim do Mar is the place to be if you are a good surfer. If you are not the good surfer, don’t go there, it can be dangerous. And just go to the north, dom a weekend and our friends will take care of you for sure, because these are amazing companies that are there for a long time teaching people how to surf in the Madeira.

Dave:

Awesome, man. Yeah, I’ve been hearing some great stuff. I saw there was a really nice article that came out here locally from the 150sec, that’s the name of it?

Goncalo Hall:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

She did a great article. And I’ve been seeing it getting a lot of distribution. And you had mentioned you’re getting a lot of really good interest in the initiative. I think you said there’s a lot of people that have already registered. And maybe just give us a sense of the interest in this nomad village.

Goncalo Hall:

In terms of people, we reached 700 people today. We have already 700 people, and I can guarantee you, there’s only 100 people at any given time that will be around, for several reasons. The first one is housing, there is limited housing in the village. 100 houses, it’s a lot for them. So there is limited housing. We have 700 people interested, so we’ll have a lot of people. In terms of media, it’s just going ballistic, to be fair. Since the 150 was the first international article that really wrote something good and interesting and proper. It was a very, very good article. I was very surprised with how good the article was. Most of the media just copied the PR and just posted on their websites. This is a good article. It brings us to a lot more people. We have now, requests from people from all over the world.

Goncalo Hall:

We have people, journalists from the west, flying to Madeira and staying there for one month because they want to see it, they want to do the interview from there. We have a German television coming over as well, because they went to interview and film there. So yeah, just a lot of doors opening, a lot of interest. Like I said at the beginning, it’s not the first in Europe, but everyone I’m speaking about, this is the first in the world. At least somebody proved me wrong, I couldn’t find anywhere else where you could, where the government and the private person, because this project is not myself, only. I’m working with the government with local government.

Goncalo Hall:

It’s the first time in the world I see the local government partner with this private person and building a village from scratch for digital nomads. Things like free co-working space, the partnerships we have locally. We want to bring the charity make-over from [inaudible 00:19:39] also, and do a weekend where we have the local charities there. It’s a lot of… Yeah. When you have the government support and when the locals support you, when you partner with the right people, beautiful things happen. And that’s what’s happening right now in Porta do Sol. We didn’t even start it.

Dave:

Do you think Ronaldo might show up, because I hear Ronaldo lives in Madeira Island?

Goncalo Hall:

Well, yeah. He has a lot of houses in Madeira, mostly [inaudible 00:20:06] outsides. Who knows? Maybe. We can push him, but he’s very secretive about where he was. I need to follow him on Instagram and send a message every day.

Dave:

Yeah. But I hear there’s some recruiting some VIPs, too. You’ve got some nomads that have been traveling the world, that have expressed interest. So besides people that are just getting into the movement, there’s some people that are really well known, who are planning, hopefully we’ll make it as well, right?

Goncalo Hall:

And it’s so good. Right now it’s a little bit of a special situation because Europe, it is pretty much closed to outside traveling. But we have, even in [inaudible 00:20:38] all the most interesting people I know are traveling there. Even without invitation, they just saw it, they loved it and they are coming. And I was like, “Oh, you’re coming?” … from there are coming. I would not tell you the names, but some leaders, for example. For me, the best person that speaks about VAs, she’s coming as well. She has an amazing community. I’m pushing Jonathan Carol to come, but he’s in Mexico, and right now it’s impossible for him to travel to Europe. But yes, I’m still mind blown with everything that’s happening, with everyone that’s coming. And I really want… All these people I met as a digital nomad in different places. I met Jonathan Carol in Canggu, for example, in Bali at the last [inaudible 00:21:24] so it’s really good to see all these people I met the random world, that right now are spread pretty much all over the place. Everyone wants to come and everyone wants to [inaudible 00:21:36]

Dave:

I think I lost you.

Goncalo Hall:

Can you hear me?

Speaker 1:

I can. It’s a little bit of static for some reason. I’m not sure what’s happening.

Goncalo Hall:

Me neither.

Speaker 1:

That’s better. Perfect, man. Yeah, we’re excited here at NomadX and Flatio, we’re going to be helping out on the platform side, uploading a lot of new listings and trying to increase the inventory. I know you’ve got partnerships with a couple of real estate companies locally. We have Michelle from Nomad Escape, who’s coming. And just for everyone that’s on, that part of our group, a lot of people refer to Madeira Island as the Hawaii, a small Hawaii of Europe. And Madeira Island just won an award for the number one island travel destination in Europe. And I think it’s won that some crazy number of times, 14 out of the last 15 years. So it’s a place maybe a lot of Americans or maybe even some Europeans have heard about, but never been to. This really creates a great opportunity for people to go check it out. And the weather there I’ve heard is very nice.

Goncalo Hall:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

Like you said, the surfing’s good. How about the food? I hear they have good food there, as well.

Goncalo Hall:

Man, the seafood is insane. Well, I’m in the middle of the Atlantic, so tuna is the thing there, if you like tuna steak. That’s the best place in the world to eat tuna steak, it comes straight from the source. They have amazing food. And be careful, because there is this drink called Poncha, and it’s very dangerous. If someone here in the comments went to Madeira, be careful with Poncha. It’s delicious, it’s strong, and it may break you. But you should finish every day with a sunset and a Poncha. Yeah, food is amazing, seafood is great, great, great. You can eat fish pretty much every day for a very affordable price, which is great. And yeah, we meet, yeah. And we have very good restaurants in Porta do Sol, and a very good cafe, as well. I was surprised. I was there two months ago and I was like, “This cafe looks like a cafe that could be in Lisbon, easily.”

Speaker 1:

What kind of prices would you expect for a bedroom, or an apartment, or even for a meal there? What sort of price range are we looking at?

Goncalo Hall:

As of now, and we are trying to push to even lower the prices more, because right now it’s okay. A one bedroom in the village would cost you about 600 euros. A two bedroom should go for 800, and a three bedrooms to go for about 1000. Then of course, it depends on a lot of things. In has pool, if it doesn’t have pool, how new it is, how well equipped it is. But that’s more or less the baseline. And for the food, for lunch, for example, there was a local deal. You can eat the whole meal for eight euros every day. And it’s a proper restaurant, it’s a very good restaurant. And they are doing this and we’ll keep doing it, so I guess there will be for the next five months.

Goncalo Hall:

And yeah, you can eat pretty much every day for 8 to 10 euros. And even drinks are super affordable. My friend [inaudible 00:25:10] I was watching the sunset there with the government, making known the place. And I was watching the sunset, and I wanted a Caipirinha, it’s a very personal thing for me. And it was 3.50. So 3.50 for a Caipirinha, mojitos, it’s crazy cheap.

Dave:

Nice, man. Well, listen, we’re going to have another interview, and I’m hoping to actually arrive on the island the first week of February. Are we seeing any restrictions, in terms of flying to Madeira? What’s the status, because I know the government’s kind of-

Goncalo Hall:

That’s very important, thank you for asking. Because there is no restrictions in flying to Madeira. And we offer, we, the Madeira government, offers you a free COVID test. So most of the country have to do the COVID test, about 130-150 euros to Madeira. You just fly there and you do the test on arrival. It’s free, it’s the offer from the government. They are doing a great job. It’s super fast. I counted the time since landing, until departing from the airport, basically. Arriving, getting the luggage, doing the COVID test and getting the car, took me half an hour since the wheels of the airplane touched the ground. So it’s super, super fast, super well built. I was super surprised, actually, because for example, again, [inaudible 00:26:21] it doesn’t work so well and it’s not that fast. So restrictions there, there is only right now, because the cases grew because of Christmas, and right now there’s around 95 cases a day, which is not too bad.

Goncalo Hall:

But for Madeira it is, so they wanted to lower the number. Right now is a curfew through the end of January from 7:00 PM-5:00 AM. When I told this to my community there already, they said, “Yeah, perfect, so I guess I will have more deep work in the evening instead of the morning.” So basically, people are going out in the morning, they are working out in the morning, going out and then working in the afternoon, and then just enjoying the curfew. But it’s until the end of January, there is no expectations that they will close the economy at all. This is the wildest thing that the government did there, so they want to keep the economy open. The cases are under control. We had 120, and then it’s going down into 95. So I guess the numbers will even be lower after the small evening curfew. So yeah, besides that restrictions, there is nothing else happening, which, compared with the rest of the world, is quite good.

Dave:

That’s awesome. I think I hear that if this initiative is successful, we can expect more initiatives like this here in Portugal, and then you’re also in touch with other places throughout the world. Maybe just give us a little bit on what you think the future of this initiative looks like here in Portugal, and then even in some other locations as well.

Goncalo Hall:

I’m pissing off the government a lot. I am the little bug [inaudible 00:27:56] pretty much, because I’m talking with the tourism board, I’m talking with the Secretary of State, of visit and transition to build something decent, to build this community, to build more communities. Because we were lucky, we are very spoiled in Portugal, we have amazing communities. A little bit, thank you to NomadX specifically in Lisbon. You built a very strong community. But also, [inaudible 00:28:15] has a very strong community. Porto is building a very strong community. Peniche is starting to build a very strong community. So I want to do this around Portugal. People are looking for the coast, the cost is great, but I know a lot of really amazing the countryside. Chaves is one of them, [inaudible 00:28:33] is crazy beautiful. Even Elintez, who has a lot of opportunities. I want to work with the Portuguese government.

Goncalo Hall:

Now let’s see if it happens or not. There is no contacts to be hired, but that’s my dream, I’m Portuguese. I would like to do this for Portugal, but at least three governments already reached out because they wanted to do the project there, which is kind of mind blowing because I just started, I’m not even there. But they saw the project, they understand that what they are doing is not actually attracting anyone. They understand that they created this [inaudible 00:29:05] digital nomad that is not working. And I know why it’s not working, then they now know why it’s not working, and they want to work with me, as well.

Goncalo Hall:

So the future looks exciting, I think it will be good for the nomad community to have more communities where they can just jump in. A lot of countries have a lot of good opportunities. I see, for example, in Europe, we have Greece, we have Croatia, we have, even Albania. We have Montenegro, we have so many beautiful places that we don’t go because we don’t know how it is to live there. We don’t go because there is no community there, there is no co-working spaces. And the government can actually jump in and help fix that. Hopefully, I will create a lot of communities for digital nomads in some of the most beautiful places where we should be going [inaudible 00:29:52]

Dave:

Well Goncalo, thank you so much for your time today. As I mentioned, we will be doing another interview with Goncalo during the first week of February, hopefully from Porta do Sol, so you get to see it live there. I’m going to go a little bit more in depth with Goncalo about his background, and hacks, and tips and stuff. We don’t want to give away all of his knowledge today, but we plan to do future lives with you. We really, really appreciate everything you’re doing. I think it’s really, really impressive. It’s great to have you as a local Portuguese, who’s leading this initiative, and then also very open to partnering with other organizations. We think it’s going to be super successful. We’re super excited about the press. We’re also going to try and get some more press as a part of this initiative, and just create a lot of awareness. And just hopefully, really create something that’s [inaudible 00:30:44] for workers to be able to live on an island with other nomads and other future nomads.

Dave:

Yeah, we’re just super excited. Thank you everyone, for joining this live with us. And thank you, Goncalo. Really appreciate everything you’re doing. I’ll drop some links in the comments so you can find out more information, and we’ll respond to you there if you have any questions. Yeah, any last words Goncalo, before… Oops. It looks like we lost Goncalo. That was it. This is our first Hell Yes live. We have another one coming up next week with Marcia Weider. She’s actually from the Dream University, originally from California, was living in Italy. She’s done a lot of traveling throughout the world. She’s a friend of mine here locally. We’re going to talk to her next week. And then also tomorrow, just so you guys know, we were supposed to do a live with Michelle from Nomad Escape. We had some technical issues, so it got moved to tomorrow.

Dave:

The live will be happening at 3:00. Nomad Escape has some awesome new programs starting up this year, and starting up in the south and the Algarve. We also have initiatives happening in Madeira, as we just mentioned. Michelle’s a close friend of NomadX. You’ll be noticing if you get emails from us, that you’ll get a promotion from her. Also check out within the group. We really appreciate everyone’s involvement. If you guys have any questions, feel free to ask them in the comments. We also encourage you all to post in the group. Ask questions, show pictures of where you all currently are, anything cool that’s going on, just keep us updated. But for today, that’s going to be it. And just want to thank everyone so much. And please share this information with your friends. We hope to see you there in Madeira, and Ponta do Sol. Cheers everyone.

ABOUT NOMADX

NomadX is a European accommodation marketplace for remote work travelers and digital nomads with over 11k listings across 18 countries with stays for 2 weeks to 12 months and average stays of 3 months. The business was started to meet the needs of the rapidly growing global community of location-independent remote workers, or “Digital Nomads”.
As Digital Nomads ourselves, we know what the market is looking for: trusted, affordable accommodations in highly-attractive locations worldwide at 50% less than AirBNB. We also run the popular NomadX Private Travel Community  where we share hacks, tips & special offers to our community members which can be found @ https://m.facebook.com/groups/nomadx/

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