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NomadX live interview with Hannah Dixon

🔥NomadX live interview with Hannah Dixon to promote her 5 Day Virtual Assistant (VA) Challenge next week for 5 days, only 1 hour per day on your own time and it’s free!🔥

👉🏼Get registered for free here: https://digitalnomadkit.com/5-day-va-challenge 

✨Hannah Dixon is a Virtual Assistant Coach & Match-Maker running one of the largest and longest running VA training platforms, Digital Nomad Kit. She’s trained over 12,000 VAs who go on to work with top entrepreneurs and thought leaders.💞👩🏼‍💻

✨Hannah focuses on creating standards of excellence in the remote work space with regards to ethical pay, diversity, and creating meaningful communities. This has elevated her position as the go-to person for hiring ethically and intelligently.

👉🏼 After 13 years of continuous travel, she’s a staple in the digital nomad scene and has been featured in The James Altucher Report, iNews, Thrive Global, DNX and numerous other media outlets and stages on travel and entrepreneurship. ✅

🔥 Watch our next interviews! Join our community Facebook.com/groups/nomadx

Interview Transcription

Dave:

Hey Hannah, how are you? Good to see you.

Hannah Dixon:

Hey. You too, you too. Finish what you were saying.

Dave:

All right. Awesome. Happy Friday.

Hannah Dixon:

Happy Friday to you too. Thanks for having me here.

Dave:

All right. Well, I think a lot of the people in our group already know you because you’ve been live a couple of times in the Nomadx community. If you go to the Nomadx website you can also find Hannah there. We have her as an affiliate of Nomadx, and she helps train virtual assistants all around the world. She’s trained, I think she said 12,000 digital nomad assistants. She has her five-day virtual assistant challenge coming up this next week, February 22nd to 26th. And I think you said he already has 800 people registered if I’m right. Is that correct?

Hannah Dixon:

900 now.

Dave:

900. Okay. I thought that sounded a lot. I was thinking maybe that information was wrong, but 900, that’s amazing.

Hannah Dixon:

It’s been so busy the last couple of … Oh, since the pandemic hit I think so many more people are looking for ways to work remotely, and they’re finally catching onto this digital nomad idea, and it’s been blowing up.

Dave:

That’s awesome. Yeah. So, I think after this interview today we’re really going to focus on the virtual assistance, the five-day challenge. I’d love to talk to you a bit about some of your other activities you’ve been involved in, but just to kick things off, let’s tell everyone what’s up with this five-day challenge, what’s involved with it, what do they need to do to sign up, where do they  go? Give us the rundown.

Hannah Dixon:

Sure. Awesome. So, the five-day that VA challenge is a free five-day course. I’ve been running it for a few years now. And we always tweak and refine it to make sure it’s the best it can possibly be. And what it is, it’s five days to get you set up as a virtual assistant. Now, that isn’t going to promise you you’re going to be out to completely run your business from that, but what it does give you is a really good groundwork to work from. So, you get to figure out what services you can sell now, and identifying skills that you have that you can turn into services. That’s probably more important to know. So, a lot of people come to us and they say, “Well, I don’t know, is this really for me?” And that’s what the challenge is about. They come on the first day, they identify what existing skills they have, how they could set them up as a service online, and who to sell their services to. And I’m not going to give too much away because a lot of tasks are surprises because we tailor it to each group, which is also one of the reasons it’s so much fun. So, some of the tasks will take you through some scary stuff where you actually reach out and potentially get clients. A lot of people do get clients from that first week, which is quite a shock for some people. They’re like, “Oh, I got a client, now what?” But all the questions are answered. There’s lots of Q&A sessions with myself in there. Lots of scary stuff that takes you outside your comfort zone, but within a really supportive community with lots of really experienced VAs to chime in and give feedback along the way. That’s a bit about it.

Dave:

So, my understanding is, it takes place over five days, it’s an hour long, right?

Hannah Dixon:

Yes. So, it’s at your own convenience though. So, the lesson drops every day at one time, but you don’t have to be there at that time. You can take that whatever time suits you. If you have a full-time job, if you have kids or whatever, you can fit it into your day as needed. So, it’s just about an hour you need to set aside to do that each day.

Dave:

Cool. We’ve got a lot of people jumping in the stream here, and we’ve got a few questions from some people. Even my buddy, Rich, just got in here, which he’s never joined us before. He’s not a digital nomad. He’s just a friend of mine.

Hannah Dixon:

Curious.

Dave:

Yeah. We’ve got Kim Gorks. She was saying, “Whoop whoop, so excited for all the challengers. And we have always such a cool vibe in there.” We have Naomi Chapman, “You’re the best challenge ever.” You don’t have to know.

Hannah Dixon:

Oh, thank you.

Dave:

Kim Gorks says, “There’s always so many different characters and backgrounds of people in there. I think it’s one of my favorite parts.” So, yeah, we’ve got … Everyone really enjoys your virtual assistant programs. Yeah, I’ve been super impressed with it. One of the things that I thought was interesting too was trying to help people avoid the pitfalls. I saw on your website you’re talking about more of a master mindset, not so much about getting jobs on Upwork, but really trying to elevate yourself and get paid more of a premium for your services. Maybe you can just tell us a bit about that because I found that really interesting, because when people think virtual assistants, sometimes you’re thinking Philippines or … What is the profile of these virtual assistants and what kind of work do they typically do for people? Maybe just give us some insight, because I think we have a lot of virtual assistants in the community, but I think there’s a lot of people that could also benefit, whether it’s hiring virtual assistants or even becoming one themselves.

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah, absolutely. So, a virtual assistant, if you just look at the terminology itself, virtually assisting someone, that could mean anything. And that’s really how wide the scope is when it comes to doing this work. And I think it was on the Nomadx Clubhouse chat last Friday, really interesting that I really took on. He said it’s a bit like being a doctor. You could be a doctor and you could be a general VA, or you could specialize. You could be a brain surgeon, slash, you could be someone who specializes in funnel creation. So, you can really take it in many different ways, but I’d say the main avenues are within general administrative work, creative work or tech work. And then there’s a lot of overlap, and you can go in many ways from there. So, in terms of what you can do is pretty endless. And I think that a lot of people, when they’re approaching the idea of becoming a virtual assistant, a lot of them are still holding onto the term ‘assistant’ in what we think that means in a traditional work trajectory. So, we’re thinking that’s someone who works for someone in an office, you get a set amount of pay, you have a set amount of tasks, and you’re stable within that. So, actually there’s pros and cons to it. I like to think it’s definitely more pros. You have a lot more freedom as a virtual assistant because you’re actually building a business. And I think this is the thing, this is one of the big pitfalls that I see people falling into is treating it like it’s just, you’re applying for jobs. And I always say my favorite phrase is, “Stop applying for jobs, start creating opportunities.” So, when you’re a virtual assistant, you have to be the person in charge of marketing, the person in charge of sales, the person in charge of your bookkeeping at the start for sure. So, pretty much you wear a lot of hats, and I think people don’t step into the mindset that you need in order to fulfill those roles. It’s not applying for jobs, it’s not going on to Upwork. A part of that is, but you can’t rely on just applying for jobs and sitting back and hoping that someone’s going to pick you. You have to prove yourself out there, you have to be visible, you have to stand out, you have to build a brand, you have to network. I think that’s a really big one, networking. People don’t realize the power of that. And I get it. It’s like something that’s very difficult to do if you’re an introvert. A lot of VA’s tend to be more introverted just by default. People don’t really want to be in the center stage, they want to be behind the scenes doing the stuff, but there is an element of just having to push through and still show up because that’s how you connect with people remotely. So, I think some of the biggest pitfalls are definitely surrounding mindset and stepping into that role fully as a business owner.

Dave:

Cool-

Hannah Dixon:

If that makes sense.

Dave:

Yeah. I could definitely see that. So, I was reading here too, that it’s not just for new VAs. It could be for existing virtual assistants that are looking to level up on their skills. So, just for the community out there, it’s not just for new VAs or the rookies, but it’s also for VAs that are looking to improve their skill sets, if I’m correct.

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah, absolutely. I think that we do get a lot of people coming through us who have said, “I’ve been doing this for a year and like, I’m sort of stuck at this level of income,” or, “I had all these clients, but I can’t level up from here,” or, “What should I …” And normally they come through us and they try to figure out a niche, or they’re trying to figure out how they can charge more, they can package their services differently. So, it’s definitely really helpful if you just need a bit of a refocus, redirection, maybe even just to network with some other really cool VAs and grow that network.

Dave:

Cool. Are there any prerequisites or requirements for the program?

Hannah Dixon:

Yes. But they’re very small. You need to have a laptop, a smartphone would be ideal, access to good WiFi connection. That’s pretty much it.

Dave:

All right. So, this lifestyle, what I’ve noticed, and I never really thought about this a whole lot, but it’s a great way to get started as a digital nomad or just become location independent. Even if you start the business from home you can basically take the job on the road with you. So, I think that’s another thing that’s really desirable about the virtual assistant profession is that it is very flexible, right?

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah. And I think that there’s so many ways you can take it. It’s such a good entry point into remote work, especially if you don’t want to just have a remote job. For example, if you really want to be self- employed and start building something for yourself, this is a great entry point. Even if, let’s say, your end goal is I want to be a coach or I want to be a course creator, and that was my case, and now creating courses about this, but it’s a really good springboard for so many different directions you might want to work in because you can then work in those industries much like you work your way up in different job roles, but you can do that within different industries online. So, you can learn a lot and then you can implement, and you can also do the service-based stuff while having courses, while having affiliate income. There’s so many different ways to make money just by getting started in selling services with the skills you already have. It’s just, I find it one of the easiest ways to jump into remote work.

Dave:

Cool. So, just for everyone who’s joining us, we’re with Hannah Dixon, she’s the founder at Digital Nomad Kit. And if you want to find her online, just visit her at digitalnomadkit.com, or Instagram, it’s @digitalnomadkit, if that’s right?

Hannah Dixon:

Correct.

Dave:

And we’re talking about the five-day virtual assistant challenge that starts next week for five days, one hour per day, and it’s a free program to get started. And we’re just trying to promote that at the moment. So, if you or any of your friends are looking to become a virtual assistant, you’re looking to get on the road, become location independent, this is a great opportunity for it. Hannah’s a real legend in this category. She’s been doing it now for the last five years. And I  found it interesting, I didn’t realize if you’ve really been a digital nomad for quite a long time. I was reading, I think you said you’ve been 13 years as a digital nomad. You speak at a lot of the conferences, you’ve been a panelist in the topics of travel and also on the topics of entrepreneurship as well. One of the things that I thought was really interesting reading through your bio is, it’s not just about creating virtual assistants but being very ethical as it relates to the pay, the diversity, and creating a meaningful community. So, maybe tell us a bit about that because it’s not just once you create the virtual assistant there they’re off, but you also have a whole community. You’ve got a really thriving community and people really stay connected.

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah. Part of the community stuff, I’ve built my business on community from the beginning. That was always really important to me. When I started, I started it as a virtual assistant myself. My first gig was $5. It was on some gig website, I don’t remember which one it was. But it took me three days. It was $5, and I was so angry at the end that someone was willing to pay me $5 for those three days. I was even, “Why did you take that on and think that was okay.” Then, I  realized there’s a real problem in this space before I even got really into it. But I started my virtual assistant business, and when I did that, I didn’t know what a digital nomad was. I didn’t know what a virtual assistant was. I just knew that I could probably sell some services online. And I started a community because, and this is what moves into the diversity thing, is, I started a community, because I wasn’t seeing other queer people, I just wasn’t seeing people that I identified with very often. So, I was, “I’m gonna start a community and I’m gonna just bring those people in.” And that’s how my larger Facebook group started, my free Facebook group called Next Level Virtual Assistance. It was called something very different back then, but it’s evolved over the years. And from that I really just got into the idea of I just want to manage communities. And that has always been at the core of whatever I do. So, even now with my paid programs, the community aspect of those programs, I think is way more powerful than any of the courses. The courses are great, don’t get me wrong, but the community aspect is so strong, and so many people meet up in-person. And, how would I say that in a way that doesn’t make you look like a bit of a dick? I would say that, what it’s done for me personally is it’s helped me create a really loyal following which has really helped me in my career development because whenever I want to go in a different direction I have people supporting and lifting me up because they trust in what I’m doing because they feel a part of it. So, what I’m now trying to move into as well is helping people build more meaningful communities. And I think we’re doing a really good job of that here at Nomadx. You’re really involving a lot of people. You yourself are a super connector. I was just talking to my partner and saying that Dave is like a super connector. I’m really in admiration of how you connect people and what you’re doing on Clubhouse and just bringing the community together. So, I think you’re a really good example of that. And that’s something I want to move into more. But that’s always been the backbone of what we do. Then, the diversity element just comes really quite naturally to me as someone who comes from a, I wouldn’t say a minority, but I’m gay, I’m a woman. I’ve had some situations that have come up that may not have happened for other people. And I can identify with other people and people can identify with me. So, I think naturally I veered towards making that a priority. And in terms of ethics in the hiring space, that’s … But I can talk about that for hours. Actually something came up just yesterday. There’s just a lot of … I think we’re at a very pivotal point in humanity, actually, not just in the online space, of where inclusivity and diversity and accessibility is so much more important than ever, and we’re all having to start changing things and relearning the way we look at things. And I think that that’s going to also be really changing in the remote space. And while I’ve been harping on about this for years, I think it’s now more important than ever. And this idea of modern slavery and how actually just by saying, “I want for-hire from the Philippines,” you’re literally, just by saying that, that already equates to, “I want to pay less,” or, “I’m not valuing the skills that this person has.” So, we could talk about it’s a whole … This is a whole long thing. I could go on a big long tangent. But I’m very big on ethical hiring, ethical hiring practices. So, if that’s something anyone’s interested in, feel free to reach out to me-

Dave:

That’s really great, Hannah, that’s awesome. Yeah, I really think that’s super important. I think here at Nomadx we try and exert those virtues as well and run conscious business and be conscious not only of the people but the vendors and who we’re working with and the communities where we live and work, we just feel that’s the future. Coming out of this pandemic hopefully is an awakening of some sorts.

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah. I think so too.

Dave:

So, we’re super hopeful for that. Yeah, I was doing a bit more research on you and it sounds like you’ve been to a lot of places all throughout the world. I was reading that you had some awesome experiences in Budapest, for example. Is that still your favorite spot, or where are the top spots around the world these days?

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah, I really liked Budapest. Yeah. It’s still one of my favorite places. I’m very tied to Thailand, as much as that’s a big cliche in the nomad space, I’m really very much, my heart is there. So, I’m actually going to be moving there in probably June again. And I’m going to get a home base there. That’s my plan. With this COVID stuff, I’m, “Hey, it’d be nice to have a place that I could just go to if the world goes to shit.” I would like to just have a place. So, I’m going to be heading over back to Bangkok. Big fan of that. Columbia was great, and Portugal was great, Lisbon’s great, as you know. But Budapest stole my heart, but I can’t see myself living there or spending too much time there anymore in the future. I think this is very difficult right now with what’s going on.

Dave:

Cool. Well, I was reading, it was interesting because it sounded like you had a business, it was focused a lot on ViDi web development and SEO. That was your first business, that’s my understanding, online? It was a bit of a shit show-

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah.

Dave:

… From some of the stuff I was reading-

Hannah Dixon:

A little.

Dave:

… And that’s how this business evolves. So, maybe just tell us a little story, your pathway to becoming a virtual assistant through that business. I thought it was a nice pivot it sounded like.

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah. So, maybe it’s more interesting to find out how I got into that business and then how that evolved because I don’t think you’d be interested in that story. I actually traveled a lot via work exchanges. I don’t know if you know WorkAway, HelpX, CF1, Wwoofing, that stuff. I did that for a long time. I bummed my way around Europe and a bit of Asia with that, basically with no money for about seven years. And I’ve got to a point where I was in Italy and I was working in a construction site because clearly I’m a construction worker. And I’m working on this thing and I’m cementing and plastering and doing all this stuff. And I used to work in fashion a hell of a long time ago, really a long time ago, way back in the past. And I had friends who lived in Milan from that time, and they had invited me to a party a couple of weeks later. So, I hopped on a train up to Milan. We were about to go out, and they looked at me and they’re, “What are you wearing?” My shoes were literally squares of concrete, and it’s just … And I was, “Oh, damn! I can’t even afford new shoes. Like, something’s gotta change in my life. Like, this has been really fun, but I’m realizing that I need some money.” So, I went back to the UK, which is where I grew up, and I started working in a bar or something like that. I can’t even remember some job that I didn’t really care about. And I met someone online who was working in SEO and web development. And all that stood out when they told me that was, “I work online.” And I was, “Huh, tell me more. I can travel with that, right?” And they were, “Yeah.” I was, “Teach me everything you know.” And this ended up being my first business partner. “Teach me everything you know,” and I, by default, became the person who did the emails and the correspondence and I updated the Twitter account and I took phone calls and did all this administrative stuff that I didn’t really realize at that point I was basically becoming a virtual assistant at that moment. And that business didn’t really go very well. We took on way too much work and got ahead of ourselves and it was a mess. But for that, I realized that I was really good at doing a lot of that behind the scenes stuff. And as the business was crumbling, I was getting more clients doing the VA stuff. So, it was a nice, easy, difficult-ish, still-had-money-coming-in transition into virtual assistance. And I started realizing what a virtual assistant was, created the community. I started landing some pretty big clients, lots of big doctors in the U.S. I was making quite a lot of money. Then, people ask me, “How are you doing this?” Then, skip forward a few years, here I am today. So, that’s been my journey.

Dave:

All right. How long were you doing the virtual assistance on your own before starting the virtual assistant business with the training.

Hannah Dixon:

Three years.

Dave:

Three years, okay. Awesome. Yeah, it’s interesting because I think for a lot of the people out there, whether you’re entrepreneurs or you’ve done something entrepreneurial before or you’re considering it, I always think just the best thing is just to dive into it, get started, because I think what Hannah said, it’s, you don’t know what you don’t know until you to get into it. Then, a lot of times, if that’s not the right opportunity, you start identifying other opportunities like Hannah did with the virtual assistant. Next thing you know, she’s pivoting into that, next thing you know she’s got 12,000 people she’s training. Do you guys have a platform where you connect the virtual assistants to customers or agencies as well? Is that part of the business?

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah, I’d say it’s probably on the smaller side of the business right now. It’s something we’ve been moving into. We have matchmaking … We have a form you can fill in that auto-populates a job ad that goes out to our graduates or there’s a private matchmaking service that I do personally right now. We’re looking at making that a bit bigger as we’re getting a lot more demand now, but it has been working pretty good for the last year.

Dave:

Okay, awesome. Yeah, I was thinking about it. I was, “Wow, that’s like an amazing opportunity.” I don’t want to blow your cover here on national TV. But I was, “I need to team up with Pat. We need to get some techies to, to build this thing cause it could be like the next thing for VAs.” But I think that’s awesome. So, the career trajectory is really nice. You speak at a lot of the conferences. You’re very well known in the industry and you’ve got a great reputation, and the people that you’ve helped, they really like you. And a lot of us have joined our community just because of you being interviewed here with some of the previous interviews. So, if anyone out there has any questions, feel free to comment or hit the ‘like’ button. But we’re here with Hannah Dixon, the founder of the Digital Nomad Kit.com talking about a five-day virtual assistant challenge starting next week for five days, February 22nd to 26th. And let’s see here. So, I’ve gone through a bunch of these questions. I was also looking through your LinkedIn profile and I was impressed because it looks like you’ve done-

Hannah Dixon:

You did some stalking before this.

Dave:

I’ve stalked you, Hannah, don’t worry. Not too much, just at the surface level. I haven’t dug too deep yet. If anyone wants to find anything about Hannah, you can just ask me. But I was really impressed with a lot of the volunteer activities that you’ve been doing. And I saw like Raleigh International and then this other group Seven & Seven. Sounds like it’s the more recent one. But maybe tell us a bit about the volunteer work that you do because I think a lot of the nomads are looking to get into volunteerism, and maybe, yeah, I’d love to hear your story as it relates to this.

Hannah Dixon:

Sure. With Raleigh International, that was a while back now, it was a few years ago, but what that was was actually an exchange program where they were sending people from the UK to very small villages in India. And we were teaming up with local volunteers and so we would doing surveys and these villages, what did they really need assistance with. I actually was in charge of budgeting, which was a terrible idea. The kind of budget where we could basically implement what they needed. What they needed were bathrooms for the women to change in. And we did a big health report and we did a lot of health training on just general hygiene standards and that stuff. And actually what was cool was working with the local volunteers. We got to understand the best way to get our message across that people would really listen to, because a lot of them didn’t read or write and hadn’t really integrated with society. There were still people that lived basically in the jungle, the people that we were working with. And it was really difficult because actually the government had recently changed the rules to say that people were no longer allowed to live off the land in that way. They had to live in actual housing. So, what they did was the government built them all housing and then just dropped them there and didn’t give them any resources. So, we came in with the local volunteers to help them acclimatize to that. So, the best way for them to learn all this stuff was through theater and dance because that was the only way that we could communicate. So, we had a big theater group come in to communicate a lot of what we were trying to teach them. So, that was really interesting. Definitely I had a lot of issues with some of the ways that went down, but overall it was a good experience. And Seven & Seven is actually a conference, it’s a digital nomad conference. I’m not working with them anymore, but I was for three years. So, I was volunteering just doing this social media for three years, and I am helping them out with a lot of marketing stuff and that stuff.

Dave:

Great. That’s awesome. Yeah. Well, I think that’s inspiring. I think for the nomads out there, not just the traveling, doing your work, but really integrating with the community, getting back, I feel that’s super important as part of the nomad culture is just as we travel the world to try and get back and be conscious in the way we approach things. So, I feel like that’s super important. So, maybe a few questions here I’ve got left for you. I’m really interested, are there any plans that you have for your business here in the next year, 2021, 2022? What can we expect from Digital Nomad Kit? What’s the future hold?

Hannah Dixon:

I’ve been thinking about that myself recently. Actually, one of the things I want to do is, because I’ve been running this five-day VA challenge for so long, I actually want to move into helping people run challenge launches, because I have such a cool structure for it now. And I think that there are so many business models this could work for. So, that’s something I’m looking at doing. I just joined a mastermind, so I guess soon I’ll have some ideas to mastermind … I’m at a crossroads right now. I need to do a few new things, and I’m struggling with where to take it. But I definitely need a five-day challenge or something like that, some group program maybe. And I think a lot of my goals this year are very personal. I want to get myself back to Asia. I may or may not be getting married soon. So, there’s like a lot of personal stuff going on. And I feel really grateful that I’m in a place that my business allows me to just focus on that this year. But there’ll be a few new things, I’m just not quite there yet.

Dave:

Okay, cool. Yeah. Make sure, for all you all, check out Hannah on the web. I was talking to her the other day, and unfortunately I think there was someone out there who ripped off all of your content and created a duplicate website. And when I contacted you, you had a bit of a panic mode because you were sending out cease and desist letters.

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah. Oh yeah. And that’s been happening a lot lately. I actually got a message this morning from a random person on Instagram mentioning the name of a friend of mine, an entrepreneur, saying, “I have their course if you would like a copy, even cheaper.” And I looked at the thing and it was, “We have thousands of courses.” It’s so prominent now. There’s so many people doing that. So, virtually.

Dave:

Yeah. So, for you guys out there, you make sure you’ve got the real Hannah Dixon, not the other one.

Hannah Dixon:

There’s only one.

Dave:

Maybe she looks like you, I don’t know. But this is the real, this is the official Hannah Dixon that we have here live, not the other ones that are out there. Yeah. So, we’re dealing with this pandemic. We’re hoping this thing’s going to be over pretty soon. Some time, hopefully, this year, definitely, I think, by next year-

Hannah Dixon:

No.

Dave:

… What does the future hold for this digital nomadism and remote work? Where do you see things going in the industry? You’ve been in the industry for so long, I’m sure you have a good perspective.

Hannah Dixon:

I think that people are going to slow … I think people were slowing down already. I don’t think that travel is going to stop. I think people are going to be more intentional about how they travel, where they travel, why they’re traveling. And I do think there’ll be a hell of a lot more people getting home basis and trying to get … One of the things I noticed with a lot of people in my immediate friend group was, a lot of issues related to not having a residency somewhere when all this stuff went down and not having government assistance. There were a lot of things that were happening with people. So, I think that people are going to be seeking a bit more security, but maybe not in a traditional sense, but, like myself, I’m going to go get a home based in Bangkok and get myself a visa for five years there so I know I have a place there. But it doesn’t mean I’m not going to travel. I’ll probably just be more intentional, like if there’s an event I want to speak at, if there’s a networking thing I want to go hang out with some people there, if I’m going for three to six months and then I know that I can be there for that time. I think a lot more people are just going to go slower and be more intentional and seeking a bit more security in some ways.

Dave:

Cool.

Hannah Dixon:

How about you?

Dave:

I think, for me, I’ve been in the digital industry for a long time, really since the 90s. So, I’m a real dinosaur. But I grew up in the industry. I love the industry. I think it’s amazing. I’ve seen it go through a lot of transformations, but I think at this moment we’re in the midst of the biggest transformation of all because we had the search wave, we had the social wave, we had the mobile wave. We’re waiting for mobile to hit for such a long time. And then it really allowed … We’ve got a fast internet connection. We have Space X, for example with their Starlink program. They’re going to be delivering the internet anywhere throughout the world, which I think is going to be amazing.

Hannah Dixon:

Yeah.

Dave:

So, I think coming out of this pandemic, I think people are really much more conscious, as I was saying before, much more conscious as it relates to their business, the businesses that they work with, how they treat their vendors, how they treat their employees. And I think people are just looking for something more inspirational from businesses these days. So, I think coming off this, we’re seeing a lot of people at the moment that are living the nomadic lifestyle, the remote works, but they might just be two hours away from their homes in a mountain town or beach town somewhere. But I think we’re really starting to see as we want those people to start taking their jobs on the road. And we expect a massive shift in this industry. I think it’s been a very early adopter industry and it’s going to be huge coming off the pandemic. So, I think it’s really going to be a transformational time throughout the world and just making the world so much more connected, not only through technology but through your physical presence. So, I think it’s a really interesting time. I think for our business, obviously we’re getting crushed right now because no one’s traveling. So, it’s, I’m a bit, just treading water and just, you try to stay alive for when the pandemic is over. But I think a lot of people are in the same situation. Some people are really thriving at the moment. You have commerce. Then, I’m sure there’s tons of people wanting to be virtual assistants. So, I think your business is super well positioned. I think maybe next time we speak to 100,000 virtual assistants under your belt. But we’re trying to keep these pretty short. We’re getting towards the end here. We’ve really enjoyed having you on the show, Hannah. I think you have an amazing background, a really great story. The work that you’re doing is amazing. I think the values you have in your company are really great. But before we leave here, I was just wondering, do you have any special offer or tip for anyone in the community just as a final parting thought would be awesome.

Hannah Dixon:

The offer is, do you want the challenge next week? It’s free. You’re going to have a hell of a time whether you decide to become a virtual assistant or not. You’ll learn a lot about yourself. You’ll learn a lot about what your space could be in the online remote work scene. I think that even if you don’t intend to be a virtual assistant and you’ve got time on your hands, it’s worth doing. We have people go for it who end up being the healers, coaches, course creators. It would really help you get out of your head and start thinking about how you can utilize what you’ve got. So, I encourage you to join us at whatever stage you’re at, if you have the time. And if I had any words to leave, I would say, what would I say? I have a lot of things I say. I would say if you’ve been sitting on an idea for a while and just sitting on it, then just come next week because I think that you’ll be really surprised at what can flourish from the idea when you’re in the right group of people who are all on the same mindset. So, I would say, just, if you’ve been sitting on an idea, get out of that paralysis and start moving. And even if it just means just showing up next week and listening, I think that you’ll find some big movements happening, some big changes happening. And if you don’t join, stop sitting on the idea. Now is the best time ever to start trying stuff. There’s nothing to lose. And I always say, there’s a bittersweet truth, when you’re starting something new, you have all the … Can I curse? Is it okay if I curse?

Dave:

Yeah, of course.

Hannah Dixon:

Okay-

Dave:

I don’t curse that much, but every once in a while I do.

Hannah Dixon:

This is just the best way to explain it. So, when you’re starting any new business and you’re starting in a new industry entirely and you’re the person who’s a perfectionist where you’re, the logo needs to be the right color or this needs to happen or that … Drop that. You know why? Because the bittersweet truth is, no one is watching you, no one gives a shit at the beginning. And that sounds horrible, but it actually means you have all the space in the world to fuck up, and you can try things, and when you try things, doors open. Just like we were talking about earlier, as soon as you start, more doors start opening, more ideas start coming to you, more opportunities start coming to you, and you realize the potential in this new path you’ve taken. So, that would be probably my …

Dave:

Yeah. The key is just to get started, you all. So, I think, for everyone out there, you’ve got an idea, you’re talking to your friends or your family and blah, blah, blah. Well, now it’s time. We’re in this pandemic. This the best time you could ever have to get started with a new business. It takes a bit of time to get started now. Listen to Hannah, she knows what she’s talking about. One thing I wanted to say before I left, because I was going to mention this earlier, but I forgot, but my virtual assistant that I hired at Nomadx, actually, she was so good I ended up putting her in charge of all the operations for our housing plan-

Hannah Dixon:

Oh, nice.

Dave:

So, these virtual assistant jobs are a great foot in the door. And generally you’re working with a lot of the top executives. You do a great job with the executives, eventually you even end up in a top position at the company, if that’s what you want. Maybe you don’t want that because it’s … Maybe it’s more stressful. But I think it does provide an entry path into the organization at a very high level, or you can just keep doing the virtual assistant work, which I think is awesome. And I think so many of the entrepreneurs out there, even corporate executives, entrepreneurial executives, just anyone who’s got a business they’ve started and they’ve been doing it on their own, having an assistant is huge because you can offload a lot of work to them, a lot of the administrative work, free yourself up to be much more strategic, actually, in the business. You’re working on the business versus working in the business. So, I think there’s so much value in it. I think this is going to be a huge movement. It already has been, but I think it’s even going to be much bigger. Hannah’s at the forefront of this. You’re going to be on the Forbes Magazine here pretty soon. That’s why I have to clean up this recording. And we’re just super excited to have you here. We’re really happy. We’re really impressed with everything that you’re doing and it’s just been great to have you-

Hannah Dixon:

Thank you. It’s mutual.

Dave:

… Affiliated with Nomadx. And we’re just looking forward to future lives. And for all of you out there, we were about to close down, but this was a great interview with Hannah Dixon, the founder of Digital Nomad Kit.com. Check it out on Instagram, @digitalnomadkit. She’s got the free five-day challenge next week. Definitely make time for it. It could change your life. And just super happy to have you, Hannah. Have a great day.

Hannah Dixon:

And I’m really happy to be here.

Dave:

… And I’ll see you at the Clubhouse at 5:00. So, for those of you out there-

Hannah Dixon:

Absolutely. Everyone, join on Clubhouse.

Dave:

Yeah. You can ask Hannah all the questions you want then. So, without further ado, thank you so much, Hannah. Have a great day. We really appreciate everything.

Hannah Dixon:

Thank you so much for having me. Thank you.

Dave:

All right.

Hannah Dixon:

Great to see you.

Dave:

Cheers.

Hannah Dixon:

Bye.

ABOUT NOMADX

NomadX is a European accommodation marketplace for remote work travelers and digital nomads with over 11k listings across 18 countries with stays for 2 weeks to 12 months and average stays of 3 months. The business was started to meet the needs of the rapidly growing global community of location-independent remote workers, or “Digital Nomads”.
As Digital Nomads ourselves, we know what the market is looking for: trusted, affordable accommodations in highly-attractive locations worldwide at 50% less than AirBNB. We also run the popular NomadX Private Travel Community  where we share hacks, tips & special offers to our community members which can be found @ https://m.facebook.com/groups/nomadx/

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