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NomadX live interview with Jasmin Singh

🔥 NomadX live interview with Jasmin Singh, legal expert in Immigration Law.🔥

✨ Live from Madeira Island to discuss travel Visas and requirements to Visit Madeira Island and other popular locations throughout the world. Where can you travel now and how to get your Visa? ✨

👉🏼 Jasmin is a leading legal expert in Immigration Law with extensive experience in both business and family cases. A familiar name in the US media and a frequent guest on TV shows around the world, she provides diverse immigration advice to a full spectrum of clients ranging from multinational companies to start-ups, non-profit organizations, artists, journalists and individuals petitioning for a family member’s U.S. residency. 💣

✅ Ms. Singh has appeared on CNN, Bloomberg TV, Televisa and TV Azteca, as well as El Heraldo de Mexico, La Mega 97.9 FM, and Univision’s X96.3, among many others. Her articles on investment-based visas and DACA have been published by Forbes Central America, El Economista and Sin Embargo, and her advice has featured in a range of leading news sources in USA.

✅ She works on complex immigration cases involving waivers for inadmissibility issues through U.S. embassies and consulates throughout the world. She is passionate about Immigration Law and stays up-to-date on the latest policy changes, interviewing members of Congress on live radio about Immigration reform and contributing to the development of the so-called “Digital Nomad” program for remote workers in response to the Covid 19 pandemic.

✅ Jasmin Singh received her Juris Doctorate from the University of Washington School of Law in Seattle, Washington, and a B.A., magna cum laude, in Political Science and Spanish Literature from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado. She has been invited to speak about Immigration Law in Continuing Legal Education classes in New York City.

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Interview Transcription

Dave: 

Hello NomadX travel community. We are going live again today, super, super excited. Hopefully you all can join us, we have Jasmin Singh joining us today. Jasmin is an immigration lawyer and digital nomad, who’s been traveling the world, she’s been working in immigration law now for 10 years. She’s the graduate of University of Washington Law School, graduated from Colorado State undergraduate, magna cum laude, captain of her tennis team, super, super impressive. She spent a couple summers actually working as a congressional intern and she’s super, super impressive, so we’re very excited to have her today. She’s actually going to be coming live with us from Madeira Island where’s she staying at the Savoy Palace in Funchal and she’s going to help us today in terms of helping people understand what does it take to actually arrive in Madeira Island, what visas are required if you’re coming in from Europe, but what if you’re coming in from outside of Europe, how do you arrive to Madeira Island? Or just general questions related to remote work visas anywhere in the world, she is a global expert and super excited to have her with us. She will be joining us now in a few minutes. She has actually presented on Bloomberg, MSN News, she’s been in Forbes, as I mentioned she’s originally from New York City, 10 years immigration expert and digital nomad. So we’re super lucky to have her with us today live from Madeira Island. I see that we’ve got like six people with us at the moment, if you all have any comments, questions, or you just want to give us a thumbs up, please do it. It looks like Jasmin will be joining us here very, very soon. She works on family and employment based visas. She does foreign companies that are moving to the US, relocating employees, she does all immigration categories plus EU citizenship by investment, entrepreneur business, employment, Brexit, golden visas; super excited to have her here with us. Please ask your questions, I will be bringing Jasmin in here in a second. Nice to see you, Michelle, here we go. Adding Jasmin, get ready everyone, this is going to be an awesome event. 

Hey, Jasmin. 

Jasmin: 

Hi. 

Dave: 

What’s going on, how are you? 

Jasmin: 

Here in Madeira. 

Dave: 

Yeah, I heard you’re in Madeira Island at the Savoy Palace, if that’s correct? 

Jasmin: 

Yeah, the Nomad village Ponta do Sol, we have a group here staying at the Savoy Hotel. I’ve already spent two weeks in Ponta do Sol, both places are great experiences. 

Dave:

Wow, it’s amazing. So yeah, we’ve had a chance to catch up here in Portugal with one of your good friends, Gene, who’s super cool and I think I saw you here for Web Summit maybe a couple years ago and then you even stopped out briefly, which was awesome. I was actually taking a look through your resume, I wouldn’t say resume, but through your LinkedIn profile and I’m super impressed with all your credentials. And having been a tennis player myself, I couldn’t believe you played for Colorado State, a full scholarship and captain of the tennis team, which I know that’s very, very difficult to get to that level, so that’s super impressive. 

Jasmin: 

My tennis days. 

Dave: 

Yeah, reading through this, I can see why you’re so successful. 

Jasmin: 

Thank you. 

Dave: 

Just to get things started here, we want to dive into the specifics. You’re an expert on immigration law, you’ve been doing this now for 10 years, you’ve been traveling as a digital nomad, so you know quite a bit. You’re on Madeira Island at the moment. We’d love your perspective, we’ve got some questions here for you that I think are common questions that most nomads have. For question number one is, if I’m here in the EU, how do I get to Madeira Island? Are there any issues I should be aware of? What is the process, say I’m in Germany or I’m in Spain somewhere and I want to go to Madeira Island, it’s a bit cold for me, how do I get there? What is the process? 

Jasmin: 

Well if you’re in the EU, you’re an EU citizen, so you can travel to Portugal. The challenge is for those non-EU citizens. But there is something you want to just keep in mind, even when you are traveling within the EU, there are some restrictions that EU countries are … For example, France right now, if you come to Portugal, and then you travel back to France, you’re subjected to a 14 day quarantine. So there are some little quarantine restrictions, but if you’re in the EU, you’re an EU citizen, you can travel here to Portugal. 

Dave: 

Okay, that’s awesome. So for anyone out there, if you’re in the EU and you’re freezing cold and you want to go to some warm weather, Jasmin says it’s okay to go direct to … You have to fly direct to Madeira, is that right? Or can you go through another airport? 

Jasmin: 

No, you can fly direct to Madeira. 

Dave:

Okay, so fly direct to Madeira. When people arrive, you can get a Covid test before you leave or you can get it on arrival, is that right? 

Jasmin: 

That’s correct. You want to check on the arrival because it’s very restricted depending on where you’re coming from. If you’re coming from Lisbon, they are allowing it to be done upon arrival. They have now, from what I know is, they’re no longer allowing it from certain countries, so if you want to be sure, get the PRC test before boarding the flight. 

Dave: 

Okay, yeah I’m arriving next Wednesday, and I was talking to Gonzalo, that’s what he was recommending, just get it done locally, 72 hours, then I can just walk in, smooth sailing. He said, I think, if I arrive and I get it done there, there’s a short quarantine period of 12 hours or so. 

Jasmin: 

Yeah, and you can also get it done, if you’re in Portugal, you can get it done for free. There’s a link, you have to Google it, there’s, I think it’s a university that’s doing the test for free, and so you can get it done 72 hours before and then board the flight. 

Dave: 

Awesome. So for all of you just joining us, we have Jasmin Singh live from Madeira Island. If you want to learn more about Jasmin, you can go to jasminsinghlaw.com, find out more about her, she’s an expert in immigration law. So yeah for all of us, or for all those people that aren’t from the EU, and are looking to come to Madeira, what are the suggestions you have for them? 

Jasmin: 

Okay, so there’s a lot of confusion going around how to travel into the EU, specifically Portugal. Since we’re talking about Project Madeira, let’s specifically just talk about Portugal. I don’t like to use the word border closures because a lot of people are under the impression that there’s no way to enter Portugal, and it’s not true. Portugal right now is not permitting travel for tourism purposes. You cannot enter Portugal for tourism purposes. There’s three ways you can enter Portugal: obviously if you’re an EU citizen and then number two, if you’re a resident of Portugal, and number three, if you’re traveling for essential purposes. Where we’re going to focus on our talk today is number two and three, it’s the D7 visa and what qualifies as essential purposes. And I want to also take a moment to explain why some people are confused and commonly asked questions on some of the requirements for coming in and out is, the EU is restricting their travel based on your nationality. The US, some of our American friends back in the US, they’re confusing the EU travel restrictions with the US travel restrictions. The US travel restrictions aren’t based on your nationality, it’s where you’ve been in the previous 14 days. So if you’re traveling to the US and you’ve been in the EU the past 14 days, then you’re no longer allowed to enter the US. So a lot of people are using, going to Mexico and entering the US. This is where a lot of Americans are making the mistake, as they’re applying the US law of traveling to the US to the EU. So it’s very important to make that distinction.

Dave: 

Okay, so I might need a little more clarification. Explain that to me again, so if I’m traveling from the US, can I get to Europe? Can I arrive in Madeira? 

Jasmin: 

There’s three ways you can travel into Portugal: number one, the obvious, you’re an EU citizen, number two, you’re a resident of Portugal, I.e. what we’re going to talk about today, the D7 visa, you have the D7 visa. The third way you can travel to Portugal is for essential travel, essential purposes, and we can discuss that now. What qualifies as essential travel? Essential travel is business, investment, family, medical, humanitarian purposes. And so what does that look like, let’s play out a couple scenarios here. You could be traveling for business purposes, perhaps you have a meeting in Portugal, you’re in the wine industry and you’re out in California, and for some reason you need to meet, go out to a winery in Douro Valley or Alentasia; well, you need to get a letter from that winery, or whoever you’re meeting, get it on a professional letterhead, and it needs to explain why you need to be in Portugal. Now this doesn’t need to be a book, it just needs to briefly describe the purpose of your travel. Obviously there’s credibility involved, have it on a professional letterhead, have a contact number, a Portuguese contact information. That’s an example of business travel. Right now, there’s a lot of Americans who are interested in the golden visa program; it was set to expire in December, they’ve actually extended it till January of next year. If you are working with an attorney or whoever you’re working out with on your golden visa, or if you’re interested and you need to enter Portugal to perhaps go see property because you want to know what apartment you want to invest in, get your immigration attorney to write you a letter explaining this; that qualifies as essential travel. So that’s investment. Another common one that we see is family. Perhaps you have family living in Portugal, let’s suppose your parents are retired and they’re living in Portugal, well what you’ll want to get is your birth certificate and proof that they’re living in Portugal, so maybe some electricity bills or maybe a mortgage statement, anything with their address and their names linked to your birth certificate. How the Portuguese government is defining family is your spouse, children, parents, and parents in laws; that all qualifies under family. So how does this work, now let’s say that you do qualify under essential travel, what does this look like now? What do you do? Do you have to go get a special visa? You don’t. All the Portuguese embassies and consulates around the world have informed airports that it’s up to the traveler to prepare and bring to the airport the proper documentation to prove essential travel, and it’s up to the airline agent to review the documentation. And if the airline agent is satisfied and they believe that your travel is true, then they can check you in and you board the flight. So there is no special visa, but I will say this, you going to the airport, be prepared to explain your travel. Make sure you have the right documentation. If you have phone numbers listed on your documents, perhaps because of business travel, tell the person on the other line in Portugal to be prepared around so and so time, just in case the airline agent calls them to verify if it’s true or not. What we found is that some airline agents will ask the same question three different times just to make sure that you’re not lying. So it’s really, your gatekeeper is the top airline’s check in person at Newark airport. So that’s how you would enter for essential travel purposes. 

Dave:

Okay. So we have, at the moment, if you’re living in the EU, there’s the potential, if you have to travel for essential reasons, which is business, investment, family, medical, humanitarian, but you need documentation to be able to prove that that’s the reason you can get in. We also have special visas, you mentioned the D7. What is the D7 and how does that work? 

Jasmin: 

Sure. So the other exception to the rule to enter into Portugal is a resident visa, you are a resident of Portugal. Let’s just skip to the most popular one for remote workers, digital nomads, it’s the D7. I’ll start by saying, the D7 creates a lot of confusion because a lot of people think it’s solely for independent wealthy people, you have to be self-employed; all it means is that you have to demonstrate that you have sufficient money to support your stay in Portugal. So it doesn’t matter whether the money comes from a trust fund, from investments, you may have an employer abroad and you’re still an employee of the company, or you’re self-employed. As long as you can prove that you’re earning income, and I’m going to tell you what the number is: that number is 680 euros a month, so 8,000 euros year, that’s basically what you want to show for the D7. So how does that look like in terms of applying and obtaining one? Well, obviously if you’re watching this video, you’re outside of the country, so you’re going to have to go to a Portuguese embassy or consulate to apply for the D7. Once you have all the documentation for the visa application, it takes the embassy two weeks to schedule your interview, and when you go in to get your interview, they’ll stamp your passport with the D7 visa, you’ll enter Portugal, and then you’ll be scheduled for another … They take your biometrics, to essentially give you your residency card. So if you’re sitting in the US and you want to be a part of Project Madeira, it is realistic for you, in the next month or two, it really depends on how fast you get all this documentation. If you get all the documentation in two weeks to four weeks to the embassy, you could realistically be in Portugal by the second month. So this is, if you want to come be a part of Project Madeira, and you don’t qualify for essential travel, you absolutely must apply for the D7 visa. Portuguese embassies and consulates are open around the world, I have verified today that they are open in the US. You can get an appointment in two weeks. You can get your visa stamp, enter Portugal, and this program goes till the summer, so there’s more than enough time left for you still to be part of the program. 

Dave: 

Yeah, and just so you all know, this is just an experimental program, we’re in beta at the moment. We’re hoping, actually the program will be extended throughout the rest of the year, which is the expectation. So for the D7, are you required to stay for any sort of minimum time period or can you come and go as you please? Are there filing requirements post getting the visa that anyone needs to be aware of? Or is it pretty straightforward? 

Jasmin: 

Yeah, anytime you apply for a resident visa, and you want to be a resident of the country, you have to stay there for at least half of the time of the year, or else what will happen is they won’t, when it comes time to renew your visa, they won’t renew your visa if you can’t show that you were physically present for at least half of the year. So the D7 visa, you do have to renew it after the first year, but maybe you just want to come for Project Madeira, from the US, and you just want to spend six months, and maybe this is just a way for you to enter and you’re not interested in renewing. Or if you are interested in renewing, it’s a wonderful pathway to get permanent residency in Portugal after five years, and then you will eventually become eligible to apply for Portuguese citizenship, which does lead to an EU passport, which is very powerful. 

Dave: 

Okay, awesome. So we’re here talking with Jasmin Singh from the law firm, Jasmin Singh Law dot com; immigration expert for the last ten years, and she’s based in Madeira at the moment, at the Savoy Palace five star, with a bunch, like 50 other nomads and they’re having a great time because there’s no restrictions. 

Jasmin: 

It’s awesome. 

Dave: 

Pretty awesome. And she’s also spent time in Ponta do Sol, which is more of the local village, so she’s got the village experience, the five star experience, we got the right person here. Let’s see, so any other … I’m not an EU citizen, we got border restrictions, I think we’ve gone through all the options here, we covered the D7, we discussed essential travel. Anything else we should know about? 

Jasmin: 

If you really want to come to Portugal, the only reason I see that you could not make it in here is because you can’t prove that you have access to 8,000 euros a year. If you don’t qualify for essential travel, by default it’s the D7 visa. And the D7 visa, just to remind you again, it’s not for retirees, it’s not for just solely wealthy people; you just have to demonstrate that you have 8,000 euros to support you for the year. 

Dave: 

That’s great because when I arrived here, I ended up coming in through the real estate visa, it probably would’ve been much easier getting the D7 than having to buy real estate and waiting for the visas, and it takes quite some time. So for you all out there who want to come live in Portugal and you’ve got the income to prove … I almost equate it to the remote work or digital nomad visa for Portugal, but it’s called the D7. So it existed before all of this pandemic craziness, so maybe mislabeled a bit. 

Jasmin: 

Yeah, and look like I said, a lot of Americans are interested in this golden visa program. If you’re working with an immigration attorney, you want to come look at investments, don’t forget that qualifies as essential travel, you just need that letter from the attorney. 

Dave: 

Okay, awesome. So let’s see here, so we’ve got Jasmin. We’ve talked a bit about how to get to Madeira, so for all of you who are dying to get actually get to a warmer climate, we have Madeira Island, which we’ve just launched recently when the government in Madeira, combining a public and private effort that seems to be going very well, just got started a little bit less than a month ago. But let’s talk a bit about Madeira. So let’s change the topic here a bit to remote work visas around the world. One question for you, what is the difference of traveling and working remotely on a tourist visa versus getting a remote worker visa? 

Jasmin: 

I wanted to make this distinction of why not just travel on your tourist visa and go work from a country on your tourist visa; why do you need a nomad visa? So let’s just look at the tourist visa first. Most tourist visas, most countries will grant you entry as a tourist for 90 or 180 days. I’ll give you an example, Europe, it’s 90 days. If you go to Latin American countries, they’ll grant you entry for 180 days. But let’s say that you want to spend more time in a country than 180 days, you want to spend one year, you actually need to start looking at the nomad visas because many countries will only restrict you, even if they let you in for 90 days at a time, they’ll only let you in the country for 180 days total. So if you want to spend that next year somewhere, you actually have to apply for a residency visa. And I’ll go ahead and tell you another trick I tell my clients is, if you’re trying to decide whether you want to play with your tourist visa and max out the 180 days, and then there’s some countries like Thailand, where you can leave and then restart the visa and they don’t really govern their tourist visa. And then there’s some other countries where they’re very ambiguous, they don’t really tell you what the maximum stay is, they just tell you it’s at our discretion until you can actually prove that you have an established life outside. If you ever find yourself dealing with those countries, use this trick: as a general rule, most countries, once you spend 180 days in that country, you become a tax resident. That doesn’t mean you’re necessarily going to pay taxes, because some countries actually have rules that the income was not generated within the country, then they’re not going to be subject to taxation, but I don’t want to get too into the tax part, the purpose of this is to get you to start thinking. Once you become a tax resident, you’re no longer a tourist in a country, and anytime you’re starting to bend those lines, then you’re probably not going to be able to re-enter that country wherever you are. So I tell you this because it helps, when you’re making that decision of okay, do I want to go somewhere for 90 days? Do I want to go somewhere for 180 days? Or do I want to plant my roots for a year? So now we have over 25 countries that are extending this remote worker visa, and almost all of them are giving you one year on the visa. There’s a lot of different countries, but I can tell you, I’ve found trends in these visas, and I’ll go ahead and discuss with you what some of the general requirements are for most of these visas. These countries want you to come in and spend money, but they don’t want you working there. So clearly, you have to show proof of income, whether you’re self-employed or from a company outside of that country. So how do you show that? Maybe if you’re self-employed, PNL statement, your last year’s tax returns, something that hits a little to home for the US is your W-2s, 1099s, you have to show this documentation to show that you actually have income. So expect to have to go through that exercise. Number two is the wealthier countries, the Antiguas, the Caribbean Islands, the European countries, these countries are going to want to see proof of health insurance. So there’s a lot of wonderful nomad health insurances out there, I think I have one for 50 euros a month, they’re very easy to sign up online. But they’re all going to want some sort of, if you enter, you have some sort of health insurance. The third one, it’s not all the countries, but you do need to be aware of it, some of these countries are asking for some criminal background checks. In some countries you call them police certificates, in some countries, like in the US, we call them FBI background checks, something to consider if you do have something in your history, not all of these countries are requiring it, but some are. And the other thing you want to be conscious of as you’re choosing, looking which country is ideal for you, is the application fees vary dramatically between these countries, we’re talking anywhere from $150-2000. So expect to be able to prove or meet those four requirements. If you focus on those four requirements, you will be eligible for most of those nomad visas. 

Dave: 

Okay, so we got proof on income, proof of health insurance, background check, would be an FBI check in the US, and then check on the application fees. We got a couple questions here, maybe we’ll just take a second to take a look at these. Allison Alvera asked, do you have a list of those countries, the 25? Or where can she find those? 

Jasmin: 

I do. How about afterwards, I’ll post them in the comments? 

Dave: 

Yeah, that’ll be great. Afterwards, if you want to go through and just answer any of these comments, so anyone out there who does have questions, comments, put them in the comments and Jasmin will get back to you. 

Jasmin: 

I wish I could go through every visa, but the reality is, they’re very similar, so what I did is I just chose the main requirements, the trends that I’m seeing in them, so just focus on those four categories that I told you. 

Dave: 

Okay. We have one other question, too, from Bikram, he said a quick question please, are these guidelines applicable for non-US residents, too? 

Jasmin: 

Okay. Are we talking about the Madeira Project or are we talking about the remote? 

Dave: 

I’m not sure, he doesn’t say here, maybe just hit on both of those. 

Jasmin: 

Okay, because okay so, it sounds like a question you would ask when we were talking about how to enter Portugal. If you’re not, this does apply to, if you’re not an EU citizen basically, it applies to you. Think of it that way.

Dave: 

Yeah, so Allison, we’ll provide you with a list of those countries. We just had Andrew joined us, he was with a nomad insurance program, so yeah nice to join us, Andrew. He joins us typically on our Friday clubhouse lives at 5 o’clock, so nice to see you Andrew. 

Jasmin: 

Well perfect, there’s the insurance you need for some of these visas. 

Dave: 

That’s right. Andrew, leave us the URL for your visa and we’ll get you some customers. Let’s see, one other question here. What are any suggestions I should consider before selecting a remote worker visa? 

Jasmin: 

Okay, we’re during the pandemic, we can’t assume that every country is open. Every country is opening at their own pace, so there’s some countries where embassies and consulates are not open. If you’re looking at, for example, Norway has a remote worker visa. If you’re looking at that specific program, then I suggest you look online in your home country to just make sure whether that embassy is processing visas. Most embassies and consulates are up and running, from my experience and me going through this process, but there are a few that are not, so it’s something to consider. The second thing is income. Depending on what visa, what country you’re looking at, the requirement threshold for how much you should be earning for them to extend you that one year is going to change. I’m going to tell you, Iceland is somewhere north of 86,000 US dollars, the Caribbean Islands, the income requirements are high. I found a trend in the digital nomad visas, there’s usually three categories. If you make above 4,000 euros, $4,100, you can qualify for essentially all of them, all of the remote worker visas. Then there’s another category of countries between 4,000 and 15,000 euros, give and take currency conversion, those are the mid-countries. 

Dave: 

4,000 – 1,500, I think you said 15,000. 4,000-1,500. 

Jasmin: 

Yeah, this is monthly income. That’s the second tier of countries, the threshold. And then, obviously, there’s the third threshold, which is about 1,500 euros, a country like Mexico for example, would fall in those countries. Most of the countries in Latin America fall under 1,600 US dollars, 1500 euros. Another way of thinking it, wealthier first world countries, that threshold is going to be higher. Climates, clearly. You decide on whether you want to be on the beach or you can go to Astonia, Croatia just launched their program, Greece is talking about launching their program. Something else to consider, is maybe you want to be in a country long term, for example, Portugal. Well, check and see if that specific digital nomad visa has any potential to convert into some sort of permanent resident card. And then if it does convert into some sort of permanent residency or citizenship, and Portugal, let’s go back to using this as an example, if you come in on the D7 visa, the digital nomad visa, you can eventually apply for permanent residency, and after permanent residency, apply for Portuguese citizenship, which is en EU passport. So these are some things just to keep in mind because maybe you’re not exploring for a year and you’re trying to set up something a little bit long term, but those are about four factors I would say keep in mind when you’re selecting. 

Dave: 

Okay, awesome. I know when I moved to Portugal, because my original intent in being here was just to spend a little bit of time in Portugal, but then also be able to travel around the world very flexibly, so that’s where the golden visa made a lot of sense because I think I’ve only got to spend up to two weeks max and then I have a path to citizenship. It’s like an investment. 

Jasmin: 

Here’s something, there’s a lot of people from the UK that are interested in the golden visa program. If you actually want to live in Portugal, in a lot of ways, the D7 visa is a better approach to take. It’s faster, you don’t have to make a 350,000 euro investment, but you do have the constriction that you do have to have a physical presence within Portugal. And again, remember, these residency visas want to see that you’re living in these countries for at least half the time of the year. However, the golden visa is a great option if you want residency or an EU passport, but you don’t want to have to comply with residency requirements. So that’s why I tell people between the D7 and the golden visa, it really depends on where you want to be living. If you don’t want to be living in Portugal, but you want to have access to an EU passport eventually, then you want to go with the golden visa. If you want to live in Portugal and you don’t want to make an investment and you’re okay spending at least half your time in Portugal, go with the D7. 

Dave: 

Definitely, yeah. The D7 visa’s a really great visa, and I think a lot of people get interested in Portugal because of the golden visa, but they don’t realize this D7 visa exists, which is actually a much better option and much faster for a lot of people, too. Like you said, you can get it in two weeks to a month, where the golden visa can take a lot longer. Okay, so for everyone here, we’ve been going through immigration, talking about being able to arrive in Madeira Island with Jasmin Singh, she’s a digital nomad, immigration attorney, you can find out more jasminsinghlaw.com. She’s got a super impressive background, I think from Colorado State University, where she was captain of the tennis team, magna cum laude, so she’s got quite a background. I can’t remember how many languages you speak, but she worked as a Congressional intern for a couple years and I think even in Spain you worked, too, with the ambassador there? 

Jasmin: 

I was selected to work in the US embassy in Spain. 

Dave: 

Ah, that’s amazing. So yeah, you’ve got quite a resume here, I’m seeing they only selected seven or eight people across the whole country, and you were selected, so we’ve got an amazing resource here with Jasmin. She graduated from the University of Washington, from the law school, this was ten years ago, so she’s got a massive background in immigration law. And then she’s been traveling as a digital nomad for quite some time. Where are the main places that you’ve been to or where do you like to travel to? I think you were down in Mexico for a bit, you’ve spent a lot of time here in Portugal. Maybe give us a little background in terms of your travels, just for the interested people. 

Jasmin: 

Sure, so I’ve been a nomad now officially for about two and a half years. I like to spend at least six months in a country because when I get settled into a country, I like to have my office space, I like to have my monitor, I have to have my personal trainer, a gym, so I like to get into a routine in a country. I’ve been spending, let’s see, I spent time in Mexico, I’ve spent time in Portugal, Nicaragua, I would love to spend some time in Indonesia. Portugal has been my favorite so far, there’s just, I’m a big sailor, so it’s good for New York, working in the US time zone, great weather, Madeira’s the first for me, and I’ve been pleasantly surprised with Madeira. It’s exceeded my expectations. 

Dave: 

Cool, because I remember last time you were here, you were doing a lot of sailing, this was in the fall. You were learning how to sail, you were working on your skills, or just doing it for fun? 

Jasmin: 

No, I sail, that’s my hobby. I do it every weekend. I do it in Lisbon, I race regattas there. I did it back in New York. I’m in the process of looking for a boat right now in Madeira. If you’ve in the Savoy hotel, obviously I’m going to invite you. I’m looking at a boat to take five people out this weekend, so I always gravitate to countries that have water and access to sailing. 

Dave: 

Wow, that’s great. So if anyone here is on Madeira or is a big sailer, Jasmin’s definitely someone to connect with, she’s quite a … So you’re made for Portugal. 

Jasmin: 

And I like wine. 

Dave: 

Maybe it’s part of your heritage at some point, got to check the DNA. Let’s see here, so anything else about Jasmin? Looks like we got some questions. Jasmin will go in and answer any questions that you all have, so if you have any questions, definitely leave them in the comments. We will be reproducing this video and sharing it in other locations. Let’s see here, on your end Jasmin, maybe just tell us a bit about Madeira; you’ve been there for a little while, you’ve been in the village, now you’re at the VIP area. What’s happening there? How’s been your experience so far? What should people expect? 

Jasmin: 

Okay, so Ponta do Sol, where the nomad village actually is with the coworking spaces, I’m not just saying, but it is actually my favorite part of the island, it’s beautiful. They’ve converted a culture center, the first floor into a coworking space, it seats about 26 people and it’s structured very well. They have monitors that you can go in and plug in your computer, it’s more than sufficient outlets, it’s set up. And it also has a lot of space outside to work in. And then just in front of the coworking, five minutes, is the beach, so if you want to grab a beer after work with the other nomads, we all find each other by the beach there. Ponta do Sol is about 20/25 minutes away from Funchal, that’s where most of the nomads are. There’s another group staying at the Savoy hotel. Savoy hotel has a digital nomad package. And we’re also doing things together as a community here, some of us are going back and forth between Ponta do Sol and Funchal. From what I’ve been told, eventually people at the Savoy will be taken to the hotel in Calheta, so those two communities will be, or not two communities, but we’ll be closer together. Other than that, Madeira like I said, has exceeded my expectations. It’s very chill. If you like nature and like hiking, you cannot be in a better place. If you’re within Portugal, other parts of Portugal are closed, the restaurants aren’t open, they actually are here till 6 o’clock during the week, which is nice and on the weekends till at least 5 o’clock. 

Dave: 

Cool, yeah, I’ve been hearing the food there is supposed to be really good and some really nice meals in the evenings. I heard for eight euros you can get quite a meal with wine and everything, so I’m really excited because I’m actually arriving on Wednesday, I’m going to be there for the week and just meeting with some of the accommodation providers, trying to get more people signed up in Ponta do Sol and then onboarding some of our bigger hosts, and then obviously wanting to catch up with you all and check out all the different places. So for you all, Madeira’s like a mini-Hawaii, there’s some amazing hiking, there’s amazing surfing. We have one question here, what about surfing in Madeira in the wintertime? Do you find it has a nice potential? I don’t think you’re a surfer, but what do you think? Is it a good place for surfers? 

Jasmin: 

I hate the cold. I like surfing, but I hate cold water, so I’ll just say this, there are people surfing, and I know this because I’m seeing them on the group chats and I do know there’s surging clubs and surfing schools that are still in operation. I’ve been told the water’s not as cold as Lisbon, but there is surfing here. 

Dave: 

Okay, awesome. So that’s for a girl on the way, Sarah, she was asking that question. But yeah, I think surfing in Madeira should be really good, that’s one of the things I’m hoping to do while I’m there, but I’ve seen some amazing views from the highest point of Madeira, it just looked super, super beautiful. So yeah, we’re trying to keep these interviews about 20-30 minutes, I’m not sure how long we’ve gone for, but I just want to wrap things up here. We’re super excited that we had Jasmin live with us today. I guess before we leave, Jasmin, any parting thoughts for the audience? 

Jasmin: 

I keep seeing these immigration questions. If you really want to come, get a D7 visa. It’s not closed, you really can still make this program. So please don’t, stay away from the confusing information out there, if you don’t qualify for essential travel, then apply for the D7 visa.

Dave: 

Cool. Well hey, Jasmin, really nice having you on the show. I really appreciate all your time and effort today and hopefully I’ll see you out there in another week or so. And then for everyone here in the group, if you get a chance, anyone in Europe, we’d love to see you on Madeira Island. For those outside of Madeira, as Jasmin recommended, the D7 is really the way to go. And yeah, just surviving the pandemic and trying to get a little travel in and just enjoy ourselves, get a little sun, get away from the cold, maybe go out for a sail and hit some tennis balls once in a while. All right, Jasmin, well thanks so much. 

Jasmin: 

Thank you, Dave. 

Dave: 

Cheers, great seeing you today. 

Jasmin: 

Bye. 

Dave: 

Good day, take care. Bye bye.

ABOUT NOMADX

NomadX is a European accommodation marketplace for remote work travelers and digital nomads with over 11k listings across 18 countries with stays for 2 weeks to 12 months and average stays of 3 months. The business was started to meet the needs of the rapidly growing global community of location-independent remote workers, or “Digital Nomads”.
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